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mysore

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a decentralized narrative

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This installation seeks to promote the idea of decentralisation and self-reliance through Mysore silk and khadi and thereby pay tribute to the Mysore State - a state of innovators and creativity.
the installation
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Here the gorgeous Mysore Silk Saree is paired with a utilitarian yet classy khadi jacket. The idea is to portray a powerful image - the simplest and purest of fabrics used as tools to revive the glory of the Indian textile industry.

By styling the traditional saree with a more modern jacket/blazer, the installation highlights empowerment, modernity and the liberal minds of the erstwhile kingdom of Mysore - sartorially. It uniquely promotes the idea of power dressing in an Indian context.

Finally, the installation is placed on a Navalgund Durrie. Native to Dharwad, Karnataka, we choose this to highlight a craft that is currently practiced by a community of just 50 women weavers.

a tradition of sustainability
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  • The saree is made from the local Mysore silk yarn - mulberry silk - which is a natural fibre.
  • The silk production method is a low waste process.
  • Lesser chemical processes are involved than in synthetics and local cotton production.
  • Khadi is handspun, hand-woven and has a low carbon footprint.
  • The fabric was purchased directly from the local Khadi weaving community.

The entire process of silk manufacturing, the entire supply chain is incorporated indigenously...it is entirely done in India and highlighting this fact is an honour for us given that it is our family heirloom.

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Yaduveer Krishnadatta Chamaraja Wadiyar
know the craft
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Mysore Silk Saris

know the craft
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Mysore Silk Saris

Mysore Silk Sarees are manufactured in Karnataka (Mysore region), which is the leading producer of mulberry silk in the country. The Mysore silk yarn and sarees stand out from others for its exceptional quality (being produced from the highest quality of silk and pure zari), lightweight fabric and minimal yet bold design. The sarees come in vibrant colours with subtle work.

Khadi

A handspun, hand-woven natural fabric made with cotton, silk or wool. The fabric has a coarse, rugged texture that is suitable to both warm and cold climates.

Navalgund Durries

Also known as ‘jumkhaana’ in Kannada, are woven dhurries with geometric, birds or animal designs from the Dharwad district of Karnataka and have been registered with a GI tag. These rugs, which date back to the Vijaynagar empire, are woven exclusively by women.

Brought to Life at

mysore palace
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Built in 1912 in the Indo-Saracenic style and designed by English architect Henry Irwin, the palace has been the central guiding force and symbol of the erstwhile Kingdom of Mysore, now Karnataka, for over 600 years. Over the course of history, the administration, overarching policies, and running of the State was undertaken by the Wadiyars of Mysore, alongside representing our tradition, culture, and heritage.

Brought to Life with

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HH Yaduveer Wadiyar and his sister, Jayathmika Lakshmi, conceptualised this installation and worked with

  • A local khadi weaving unit for the jacket.
  • A local community of 50 women weavers for the durrie (only known practitioners of this craft).
royal patronage today
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The royal family has had a big role to play in the promotion of traditional Mysore Silk. More recently, the titular head of the family, Yaduveer Krishnadatta Chamaraja Wadiyar, founded the Bherunda Innovation and Entrepreneurship Foundation (BIEF). They work with the Janapada Seva Trust (http://www.janapada.org/), a khadi weaving unit and community in the town of Melkote, to rejuvenate and promote indigenous cotton.

His sister, Jayathmika Lakshmi, has a keen interest in textiles and sustainability and is presently working to launch an online portal to promote the Mysore style of sarees including silks.

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