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Kathiwada

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The house of Kathiwada

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The Kathiwada family believes in propagating the use of handcrafted textiles and historical techniques by making it relevant to the current generation. Their installation does this perfectly by using celebrated traditional methods and crafts in contemporary fashion designs.
the installation
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A kasota weave piece, casually tied around the waist, is a contemporary reimagining of what is traditionally used as loin cloth by the men of tribal communities in Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat.

The exquisitely crafted bead jewellery pieces here are outstanding examples of the talent of the tribal women who work on the Kathiwada farms. The detailed work and finish of their products lends it sophistication.

The bamboo jacket is the unique outcome of a challenge to local artisans by Sangita Kathiwada of the royal family, asking them to push the boundaries of their creativity while working with bamboo.

A hand-block print garment piece, also known as bagh print, adorns the waist at the right side of the installation

a tradition of sustainability
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  • Only natural dyes were used to make the yarn for the kasota garment.
  • The bead work pieces were made indigenously using materials from the tribal women’s surroundings.
  • Bamboo was sourced from local forests.
  • Hand-block fabrics use natural vegetable dyes.
know the craft
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Kasota

A languishing craft once practiced widely by the Vankar weavers and tribals, this tribal cloth is made on a pit loom, which lends unique breathability to the fabric and controls the moisture in the yarn.

Bead Craft

These are traditionally made by the members of the Bhil and Bhilalas tribal communities who also practice pottery, bamboo crafts, and Pithora paintings in and around the villages of Kathiwada, Madhya Pradesh.

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Bamboo

Found in the local forests of Kathiwada, bamboo has been used for a wide variety of traditional uses.

Hand-block fabrics

Also popularly called Bagh prints, this traditional technique is practiced at Bagh, an hours drive from Kathiwada. The craft is sustained by the Khatri community that moved there more than five decades ago. The design involves the use of repeated geometric and floral compositions.

know the craft
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Kasota

A languishing craft once practiced widely by the Vankar weavers and tribals, this tribal cloth is made on a pit loom, which lends unique breathability to the fabric and controls the moisture in the yarn.

Bead Craft

These are traditionally made by the members of the Bhil and Bhilalas tribal communities who also practice pottery, bamboo crafts, and Pithora paintings in and around the villages of Kathiwada, Madhya Pradesh.

Bamboo

Found in the local forests of Kathiwada, bamboo has been used for a wide variety of traditional uses.

Hand-block fabrics

Also popularly called Bagh prints, this traditional technique is practiced at Bagh, an hours drive from Kathiwada. The craft is sustained by the Khatri community that moved there more than five decades ago. The design involves the use of repeated geometric and floral compositions.

Kasota

Bead craft and a bamboo

Brought to Life at

Kathiwada Raaj Mahal
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The Kathiwada Royal Family dates back nearly 700 years to 1434. The Kathiwada Raaj Mahal is the centrepiece of the Kathiwada Estates and was formerly a royal hunting lodge commissioned by Rana Onkar Sinhji in 1895.

The 19th century fully renovated plush mansion sits on 110 acres of privately owned farm land. It was carefully restored by Sangita Devi Kathiwada using authentic and organic design elements and materials. Today, the family home has been transformed into a boutique homestay experience

Brought to Life with

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Sangita Kathiwada put together this installation by working with local artisan communities including the enterprising tribal women from the region.

royal patronage today
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Sangita Kathiwada has helped propagate the cause of local textiles, crafts and techniques. As an advocate for sustainability in design, she has used and promoted these traditions for close to three decades. She has worked with various craft communities and award-winning artists across India. By use of these textiles in a contemporary context, she enables them to sustain their craft.

To help artisans incorporate latest design trends in ancient Indian handicrafts, she set up the The Morarka Cultural Centre at the National Centre for Performing Arts (NCPA). She is the visionary behind brand Mélange where she dedicated herself to the cause of redefining the role and reach of khadi and other Indian textiles.

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