Vector (3)

Jaisalmer

Vector (3)

Deconstructed identities

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An exquisite collection of myriad sub-traditions in textiles and crafts - all from one regal corner of the country, Rajasthan. Every element here represents specific sub-cultures - both known and forgotten
the installation
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This installation was inspired by the textile styles and designs as used by the indigenous communities of this region of Rajasthan.

The cloak is made of pattu which is usually a shawl but here reworked as a cloak and this is paired with local cotton dhoti pants and turban tied in traditional fashion made of local ajrak.

The turban is tied in the traditional fashion and is made of local ajrak.

On the floor and in the backdrop, we have bright geometric patchwork quilts - Ralli work which is an upcycled quilt made by sewing several layers of old fabrics, where the upper most layer is made of new cotton cloth.

a tradition of sustainability
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  • Worked with 3 artisan clusters within a 50 km radius in Jaisalmer.
  • Worked with upcycled fabric craft (Ralli) which is reusing fabric waste in local houses.
  • The craft of Pattu is known for its natural fabric and the minimal use of water in creating garments.
  • Traditional Ajrakh was picked because it is resist-printed, mordanted and dyed in madder and indigo, on both sides of the cloth through a highly complex process comprising almost 30 stages. This ancient celebrated craft of patterning cloth with block prints and natural dyes Ajrakh, with its distinctive combination of geometric and floral designs, is a legacy that continues even today, many thousand years later.

The different elements come together to highlight three separate pieces of the everyday karigar communities adorned with local silver jewellery pieces that speak of Rajasthan’s intricate and diverse collective artistic spirit which has a unique cultural identity because of years of being part of the silk route metropolis.

Chaitanya Raj Singh 1
Yuvraj Chaitanya Raj Singh Bhati
know the craft
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Screenshot 2021-03-29 at 5.07
Pattu Weaving

A popular type of weaving commonly found throughout Rajasthan and some other parts of Western India. Pattu is derived from the local word for thin strips of cloth - patti. This weaving is traditionally used to make blankets and shawls. Usually made from desi/raw wool, these are typically seen in their natural cream colour and/or black and brown.

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Ralli

A traditional product of Jaisalmer, also found in regions in Pakistan, ralli quilts can be embroidered, pieced or appliquéd. Its use of older fabrics makes it an excellent example of recycling. In fact, the name is believed to have been derived from the word ralannu meaning to mix, join or connect.

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Ajrak

A unique form of block printing found in North West South Asia. Typically, ajrak textiles have a large central body made of repetitive block prints and several borders. Indigo and alizarin red dyes play a pivotal role in ajrak designs. In its purest form, natural vegetable dyes are used for colour

Silver Tribal Jewellery

In Rajasthan, both men and women can be seen wearing heavy yet simply crafted pieces of silver jewellery. Multiple styles and designs can be found such as gajra, rakhri, gokhru, jod and many more.

Rali

Ajrak Weaves

Silver Tribal Jewellery

know the craft
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Pattu Weaving

A popular type of weaving commonly found throughout Rajasthan and some other parts of Western India. Pattu is derived from the local word for thin strips of cloth - patti. This weaving is traditionally used to make blankets and shawls. Usually made from desi/raw wool, these are typically seen in their natural cream colour and/or black and brown.

Ralli

A traditional product of Jaisalmer, also found in regions in Pakistan, ralli quilts can be embroidered, pieced or appliquéd. Its use of older fabrics makes it an excellent example of recycling. In fact, the name is believed to have been derived from the word ralannu meaning to mix, join or connect.

Ajrak

A unique form of block printing found in North West South Asia. Typically, ajrak textiles have a large central body made of repetitive block prints and several borders. Indigo and alizarin red dyes play a pivotal role in ajrak designs. In its purest form, natural vegetable dyes are used for colour

Silver Tribal Jewellery

In Rajasthan, both men and women can be seen wearing heavy yet simply crafted pieces of silver jewellery. Multiple styles and designs can be found such as gajra, rakhri, gokhru, jod and many more.

Brought to Life at

jaisalmer fort
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The Jaisalmer Fort in Rajasthan is believed to be one of the very few "living forts" in the world, as nearly one-fourth of the old city's population still resides within the fort. Built in 1156 by King Rawal Jaisal, this magnificent fort complex is also known as Sonar Kila ("Golden Fort") for its gleaming golden sandstone walls and buildings.

Brought to Life with

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Conceptualised with support from Santosh Rathi, a 3rd generation textile artist.

royal patronage today
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The royal family have long been supportive of the various communities who practice the highlighted traditional arts and crafts. Under the aegis of The Jaisalmer Fort Palace Museum, the family works with global collaborators to preserve and promote these arts keeping sustainable impact in mind.

The current Crown Prince, Chaitanya Raj Singh Bhati, is involved in various sustainable development projects, ranging from agriculture, education, heritage conservation and restoration and water conservation. With Everest Eco Hemp Private Limited, he is one of the pioneers in industrial hemp cultivation in India and is the founder of Nomh or Natural Organic Material and Hemp, a hemp-based fashion brand. When not working on his hemp clothing range, he helps out in digitising the long, illustrious tradition of folk music from Jaisalmer.

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